Save Our Public Schools: Vote No On 2

In August, the NE JLC endorsed “No on 2” because of the devastating impact this ballot initiative would have on our public education system. Question 2 would allow for the massive expansion of charter schools in Massachusetts. Charter schools already take $450 million per year statewide out of the regular public school budget. The loss of funding to traditional public schools hurts high-needs students the most by draining money used for necessary and important support services. Question 2 negatively affects teachers’ unions and their right to collectively bargain for better conditions for teachers and students.
 
Boston Public School junior Gabby speaking at a No on 2 rally on Tuesday. Read her story herePhoto credit: Jeremy Shenk
Why No on 2?
“SEPARATE AND UNEQUAL” EDUCATION
  • Charter schools siphon money from high-needs students. Charter schools receive higher funding in districts with more high-needs students, despite providing education to a far lower percentage of these students than traditional public schools. Tradition public schools are left struggling to fund and provide ESL students and students with special needs with the support services they need and deserve.
  • According to the NAACP, charter schools increase segregation within public schools. They also point to research that documents increased punitive and exclusionary disciplinary practices in charter schools. The NAACP opposes the expansion of charter schools for just these reasons.

LOST FUNDING

  • See how much your town loses to charter schools from its public school budget here. Money lost to charters could instead go to arts, music, and special education programs that all students can access.

NO LOCAL ACCOUNTABILITY

  • Charter schools lack local accountability, and are not overseen by local school boards. They are publicly funded but privately managed. More than 60% of charter schools in Massachusetts lack a single parent representative on their boards.
Read more about question 2 from NE JLC Board member Ashley Adams here, from Mayor Marty Walsh here, and from BU School of Education Professor Robert Weintraub here.

Please follow and like us: